Arturo Martini (1889-1947)

Martini struggled with his appreciation of classic sculpture in the face of the abstract art of his era. Although he realised that he had to relate to his own period, he saw no future in abstract art. In his best sculptures he integrated classic sculpture into his own iconography, breathing new life into the meaning of classic sculpture at a time when contemporary sculptors were distancing themselves from it. In ‘Judith and Holofernes’, Martini demonstrates the tension of the Biblical story soberly but effectively.

In 1960, the sculpture was given a place of honour in the middle of the lawn and it has been there ever since. It is surrounded by other human figures. On the lawn we see thin beeches and oaks. Behind the bench there is a spruce tree, near the sign for the starting point of the “7 steps”. Below it grow tiny touch-me-nots.

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Arturo Martini (1889-1947)