Isamu Wakabayashi (1936-2003)

In a publication, the artist expressed his interest in a certain beech tree in the sculpture wood. In October 2000, he collected 545 fallen leaves from this beech tree and took them to Japan. He also monitored the tree during several visits to Otterlo, studying the position, the space and the time the tree occupies. His written and drawn impressions of the leaves and of his observations of the tree were recorded on copper plates. These plates are stacked on three steel pedestals in front of the tree. Wakabayashi saw nature as his equal and connects it with his way of thinking.

It would be difficult to imagine a better example of the ‘fusion’ of nature and art, which was the ideal of Helene Kröller-Müller. The beech is prominently present in the work of art or vice versa. Helene often strolled down the lane near the sculpture, which was then still called Blauwsparrenlaantje. Now, there are rhododendrons. The holes in several of the beech trees are nesting places for the black woodpecker. Scratches made by the pine marten can also be found. Soft rushes grow around the work and sand sedge up against it.

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Isamu Wakabayashi (1936-2003)