Chris Booth (1948)

As an artist, Booth is inspired by his religious relationship with nature, in particular by the prehistoric stones as they are found in nature. This aroused his interest in local cultures in every corner of the world, and the manner in which mankind gives meaning to the materials supplied by nature. The work is specific to the place. Its completion meant having a studio/workshop on site for two seasons. The dimensions are 4 by 7.5 metres. The Veluwe and its geological history did not only serve as a source of inspiration, but also as the subject of his imagination. The name originated on site, as the result of a ‘competition’ among the staff and friends of the artist.

In the background of the work there is a grove of pine trees. In front is an oak, which seems to be part of the whole. Foxgloves can be seen close by, which blossom in June. All around you can see the rhododendrons characteristic of the sculpture garden. Bramble bushes and American bird cherries can also be recognised. The robin with its knock-knees can be spotted regularly, but the blackcap is mainly heard, with its long-lasting trilling. In front of the sculpture to the right is Japanese knotweed.

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Chris Booth (1948)