Kenneth Snelson (1927)

The high, slender tower that seems to disappear into infinity is very popular with the public. If you stand directly under the work and look up into the sculpture, you will discover that it has the form of a star. Snelson’s works are systematic arrangements of elements in the space, the principle being a balanced equilibrium of pushing and pulling forces. These forces, in the connections between the aluminium rods and the steel cables, give the work its stability. Visual criteria play no role in this: stability is both a means and an end.

The work is surrounded by the French hill: drift sand covered with vegetation. The drumming and the chick-chick call of the great spotted woodpecker is often heard. The clear, and for such a small bird unbelievably loud, song of the wren is sometimes also present. Two small groups of oaks stand nearby the tower, on which beautiful lichens are visible as proof of the good air quality. The pits in the soil are evidence of the presence of rabbits, which can eat their fill in peace after the visitors have gone.

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Kenneth Snelson (1927)