Richard Serra (1939)

This land-art project comprises a natural, bowl-shaped valley. On one side it is high and densely wooded all the way to the top. On the other side, which is slightly lower, three steel plates, which are placed at more or less equal distances, project from the slope into space. The plates are each 12 metres long, 1.20 metres high and 4 cm thick, which is quite a weight. They look like screens that have been deposited by nature. Serra sought out the place for the work himself and supervised its installation on site. He dedicated the work to his friend Robert Smithson, who, while he was working in Otterlo, was killed in his aircraft during the execution of a land-art project in America.

The middle of the valley is empty. The visitor is confronted with the work in a surprising manner. The plates are not exactly concentric, and do not create a centre point. The familiar, inward-looking character of the wooded bowl has disappeared to be replaced by an illusory movement, which draws your attention to what lies beyond, Spin out. The three plates create a completely different spatial perception. Many birds can be heard, such as blackbirds and song thrushes. One large beech and many birch trees can be seen on the slope of this peaceful place. American bird cherries are growing rampant. In spring, lilies of the valley flower abundantly.

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Richard Serra (1939)